Awards & Displays

THOUGHTS ON AWARDS AND DISPLAYS

by Barb Barrans

The following is a checklist of items to include/exclude (and think about) for a competitive list of awards.
Listed items are meant to be a guideline for both competitors as well as judges. I hesitate to assign a rigid point system as I do not believe that is the best way to judge a tray of buttons. As hard as we try to construct a classification to eliminate confusion and controversy, we find that the judging process will always involve some measure of interpretation.
Here are some thoughts on how to avoid unpleasant judging experiences.

2015-10-01 10.12.271) Read the award carefully, paying special attention to class number(s) listed, division, number and size. Read the glossary for these classes to gather additional information. Check and double check your tray, especially if you have made any last minute changes.
2) If an award is written ambiguously, ask questions ro simply don’t enter.
3) Label your tray whenever you use a button that is not completely obvious as to why you chose it. This guides the judges on your thinking.
4) Leave out any buttons that may raise questions in your own mind. Focus is the
key to determining button classification. Remember the old adage “when in doubt,
leave it out.” That said, I would like to encourage judges to extend BOD (benefit of the doubt) whenever possible. Entrants would rather have a comment made about “poor choice, or hae credit deducted from their tray, rather than be eliminated altogether.

2015-10-01 13.44.16Only very definite errors should disqualify a tray from competition.
I would like to remind everyone about Division VI, which is non‐competitive, described on Page 5 of the NBS classification. It is designed for collectors to display buttons for the pure joy of it. We invite all of you to share your favorite buttons for their artistic beauty, education, or both.